Then U.S. Army First Lieutenant Kirsten Griest (C) and fellow soldiers participate in combatives training during the Ranger Course on Fort Benning, Georgia, in this handout photograph taken on April 20, 2015 and obtained on August 20, 2015. REUTERS/Spc. Nikayla Shodeen/U.S. Army/Handout via Reuters

Then U.S. Army First Lieutenant Kirsten Griest (C) and fellow soldiers participate in combatives training during the Ranger Course on Fort Benning, Georgia, in this handout photograph taken on April 20, 2015 and obtained on August 20, 2015. REUTERS/Spc. Nikayla Shodeen/U.S. Army/Handout via Reuters

After a surprise vote in support of the expansion of the draft to include women by the House Armed Services Committee (HASC), the bill was not included in the House version of the 2017 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).  However, in another twist of events, the expansion received support from unexpected places in the Senate when Senator John McCain said he would support the measure, stating if women are allowed in combat roles, it makes sense that they be subject to the draft in time of war.

Many members of Congress have expressed support for the change, but even many of those who oppose expanding the draft acknowledge that a more in-depth review of the Selective Service is necessary in order to determine if the draft is even necessary anymore.

SWAN has been vocal in the media in support of a review, and if necessary, the expansion of the draft to include women in order to promote equality for women in the service.  For the official SWAN position, see below.

SWAN policy position
1) If Congress decides to enact legislation to modify Selective Service registration requirement, SWAN supports requiring women to register. We believe that men and women should be held to the same requirements and expectations in performing their civic duties.
2) At the same time, as the voice of service women, we believe that our military is currently well-supported by its all-volunteer force and is not dependent on a draft. Given changes in society and technology, we would welcome a debate over abolishing Selective Service registration entirely
3) While the debate over Selective Service is important, we continue to believe that the most important issue affecting service women is ensuring the successful advancement of combat integration in 2016